Chicken Tagine with Artichokes November 10, 2019 – Posted in: Recipes

 

Chicken Tagine with Artichokes
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
35 mins
Total Time
45 mins
 

Tagine is historically a slow-cooked Moroccan dish that is named after the earthenware pot in which it is cooked. My version takes out the long hours of cooking. The chicken is simmered in a spiced broth with no added fat or oils, allowing you to savor this fragrant dish guilt-free in just under an hour.

Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Moroccan
Keyword: chicken, dinner, entree, main dish, Moroccan, tagine
Robin Goldstein: Robin Goldstein
Ingredients
  • 1 quart chicken broth
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon dried ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon saffron threads
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon Spanish pimentón (smoked paprika)
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 4 large organic chicken breasts or 6 chicken thighs, both boneless and skinless
  • 8 small new potatoes, sliced into 1/2-inch slices
  • 2 tablespoons preserved lemon peel (about half a lemon), chopped fine See Recipe
  • 1 (14-ounce) can artichoke bottoms, quartered
  • 1 cup fresh shelled peas or frozen peas
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 6 sprigs cilantro, chopped
Instructions
  1. In a large sauce pot, bring the chicken broth with all the spices and salt to a boil.

  2. Cut the chicken breasts into large chunks or the chicken thighs into quarters, add to the broth, and reduce the heat to a medium simmer for 10 minutes to poach the chicken until just cooked through. Remove the chicken to a plate and set aside. 

  3. Add the sliced potatoes and chopped preserved lemon to the broth, and cook for 10-12 minutes on medium heat, until just tender.

  4. Add the reserved chicken back into the pot, with the quartered artichoke bottoms, and heat through for 5 minutes. 

  5. Scatter the peas, parsley, and cilantro into the stew to heat the peas through for a few minutes just before serving. Serve with couscous, noodles, or simply prepared rice.

Recipe Notes

Chef's Note: Use artichoke bottoms rather than hearts as they are firmer and hold up better in the stew.